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Book
Color studies.
Authors: ---
ISBN: 9781609015312 Year: 2014 Publisher: New York : Fairchild Books,


Book
Printing colour 1400 - 1700 : history, techniques, functions and receptions
Authors: ---
ISBN: 9789004269682 9789004290112 Year: 2015 Volume: 32 41 Publisher: Leiden Brill

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Abstract

In Printing Colour 1400-1700, Ad Stijnman and Elizabeth Savage offer the first handbook of early modern colour printmaking before 1700 (when most such histories begin), creating a new, interdisciplinary paradigm for the history of graphic art. It unveils a corpus of thousands of individual colour prints from across early modern Europe, proposing art historical, bibliographical, technical and scientific contexts for understanding them and their markets. The twenty-three contributions represent the state of research in this still-emerging field. From the first known attempts in the West until the invention of the approach we still use today (blue-red-yellow-black/'key', now CMYK), it demonstrates that colour prints were not rare outliers, but essential components of many early modern book, print and visual cultures.

From Pissarro to Picasso : color etching in France : works from the Bibliothèque nationale and the Zimmerli Art Museum
Authors: ---
ISBN: 2080135384 2080136062 9782080135384 Year: 1992 Publisher: Paris Flammarion

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Color etching flowered in France in the years 1885 to 1910, breaking the centuries-long tradition of artistic printmaking as an exclusively black and white medium. Its development was encouraged primarily by a renewed interest in eighteenth-century printmaking techniques and by the discovery of Japanese woodblock prints whose methods of composition and juxtaposition of unmixed areas of color demonstrated the dramatic and highly decorative effects that could be achieved by the superimposition of colored inked plates on a single sheet of paper. Although color etching began as an art form restricted to a small circle of artists working in Paris who were attracted to its intimacy and technical demands, its great aesthetic potential spawned a movement of considerable consequence by the turn of the century, especially for the circle of young, avant-garde artists including Jacques Villon, Joaquin Sunyer, Francis Jourdain, and Theophile Steinlen, who gathered around the master printmaker Eugene Delatre in Montmartre during the 1890s. By depicting life in the streets, cabarets and cafes of Paris, these artists fully exploited the creative possibilities of the color etching technique, producing subtly colored prints that were charged with atmosphere. Through a selection of works drawn from the collections in the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris and the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University. Phillip Dennis Cate and Marianne Grivel explore the origin and expansion of color etching in France, tracing its development within the nineteenth-century renaissance of printmaking in France and analyze its aesthetic evolution in relation to major artistic movements such as Impressionism and Symbolism. Extensive artists' biographies and a complete list of the works of art illustrated make this an essential study for collectors, students, and for all those interested in late nineteenth-century French art.

Painted prints : the revelation of color in Northern Renaissance and Baroque engravings, etchings and woodcuts
Authors: ---
ISBN: 0271022353 Year: 2002 Publisher: University Park Pennsylvania State university press,

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An old master print with colour is almost invariably regarded as a suspect object because the colour is presumed to be a cosmetic addition made to compensate for deficiencies of design or condition. This work challenges this deeply entrenched assumption about the material and aesthetic structure of old master prints by showing that in many cases hand colouring is not a dubious supplement to a print but is instead an integral element augmenting its expressive power, beauty and meaning. Published in conjunction with with an exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art and St. Louis Art Museum, "Painted Prints" reproduces and discusses a rich variety of hand-coloured prints from Northern Europe of the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Anonymous woodcuts are juxtaposed with masterworks by such famed artists as Dürer, Holbein and Goltzius. These prints, secular as well as religious, muted as well as vibrant in tonality, make it clear that hand colouring was a widespread, enduring practice, developed to satisfy the demands of both elite and popular audiences. "Painted Prints" presents research into the men and women who specialized in hand colouring and offers numerous insights into the social and economic organization of Renaissance and Baroque printmaking. It also draws on scientific analyses of the materials and techniques of hand colouring to address important questions of authenticity, chronology and condition.

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