Narrow your search

Library

KU Leuven (49)

UGent (36)

ULB (31)

ULiège (24)

UCLL (21)

Odisee (21)

Thomas More Kempen (21)

VIVES (21)

Thomas More Mechelen (20)

Hogeschool West-Vlaanderen (19)

More...

Resource type

book (57)

dissertation (22)

undetermined (2)


Language

English (68)

French (9)

Dutch (3)

Italian (1)


Year
From To Submit

2019 (2)

2018 (5)

2016 (3)

2015 (2)

2014 (3)

More...
Listing 1 - 10 of 81 << page
of 9
>>
Sort by

Book
Ventilation artificielle : guide de poche
Author:
ISBN: 9782224029920 Year: 2007 Publisher: Paris : Maloine,

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Bookmark

Abstract

Upper airways in non-invasive mechanical ventilation : physiological and clinical studies
Authors: --- ---
Year: 1997 Publisher: Bruxelles : UCL,

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Bookmark

Abstract

Non-invasive mechanical ventilation refers to methods of artificial ventilation that are implemented without bypassing the natural upper airway. This excludes the use of endotracheal tubes or tracheotomy. It is difficult to know the precise date of the first use of non-invasive mechanical ventilation. However, there is already a reference to a tank ventilator described in 1832 by John Daziel of Drumlanrig, UK. Since 1987 non-invasive ventilation performed using positive pressure ventilators (nIPPV) has been increasingly used to treat patients with chronic or acute ventilatory failure. In 1994 Hill wrote that “the evidence to support this approach has become so strong that the focus of investigation should now shift from questions of nIPPV efficacy of this therapy in improving gas exchange abnormalities, reducing diaphragmatic activity, restaure functional capacity, prevent episodes of acute failure, prolong survival and avoid hospital admissions has been reported by many authors. However, whether using volumetric or barometric ventilators, the implementation of ventilator parameters to obtain the best possible result during nIPPV is usually based in a trial and error process, and no guidelines exist even in recent textbooks published about this subject.
With respect to assisted ventilation in intubated or trancheotomised patients, nIPPV faces a unique differential feature : a supplementary variable resistance, represented by the glottis, is interposed between the ventilator and the lungs. In 1991 Delguste et al. reported episodes of obstructive apneas occurring during sleep in patients under nIPPV using volumetric ventilators and postulated that this phenomenon corresponded to an active glottic closure of central origin, in response to hypocapnia. In a subsequent experimental study in awake and asleep healthy subjects under nIPPV using volumetric ventilators, where the glottis was continuously monitored by a pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscope, Jounieaux et al., confirmed this hypothesis and demonstrated that the glottis represents a supplementary hindrance to effective ventilation reaching the lungs. Indeed, progressive increases in delivered ventilation led to progressive adduction of the vocal cords, resulting sometimes in complete glottic closure with appearance of apnea and mouth leak. As a consequence of glottic narrowing a progressive decrease in the percentage of the delivered tidal volume effectively reaching the lugns was verified. Moreover, cyclic oscillations in the glottic width with corresponding increases and decreases in effective tidal volume resulted in a periodic breathing pattern. It was thus established that the optimisation of nIPPV therapy should take into account, and circumvent, the variable resistance represented by the glottis.
In order to gain a better understanding of the glottic response to nIPPV, we performed a series of studies that form the main body of the present manuscript. Our goal was first to verify the behaviour of the glottis, and its consequences on effective minute ventilation, during increases in applied inspiratory pressure using a two-level positive pressure ventilator in the controlled mode, and to compare the glottis adaptation to this ventilatory mode with the one previously observed using volumetric ventilators. We were able to show that, due to the glottic response to nIPPV using two-level positive pressure ventilation applied through a nasal mask (two-level nIPPV) increases in applied inspiratory pressure did not necessarily result in increases in effective ventilation reaching the lungs. We suggested that the ideal ventilatory mode for a two-level positive pressure ventilator might perhaps be the spontaneous mode in which the respiratory drive is not inhibited, the respiratory pump and laryngeal muscles function being preserved. In order to examine this hypothesis we performed a second study in healthy subjects, mainly during wakefulness, and we observed indeed that the glottis had a completely normal behavior and did not play any noticeable role in the control of effective minute ventilation when a two-level positive pressure ventilator was used in the spontaneous mode. However, significant increases in effective minute ventilation were obtained only at high levels (20 cm H2O) of inspiratory pressure. This was essentially due to a decrease in respiratory frequency, that offset the increase in tidal volume attained at 10 and 15 cm H2O of inspiratory pressure. There were few data available during sleep, that showed prolonged apneas with the glottis remaining completely closed or partly open.
We then performed a further study using a two-level positive pressure ventilator to compare, in a separate group of awake and asleep normal subjects, the efficacy of the spontaneous and controlled modes of delivering assisted ventilation using two-level positive pressure ventilators. In order to define the mode that allows for the larger increase in effective minute ventilation we verified the effects of increases in respirator frequency when the ventilator was used in the controlled mode, and of increases in inspiratory pressure using the ventilator in the spontaneous mode. We found that significant increases in effective minute ventilation could be obtained with a lower inspiratory pressure in the controlled mode. Moreover, in the controlled mode the respiratory rhythm was stable without apneas or periodic breathing, whereas in the spontaneous mode in asleep subjects apneas were very frequent and long-lasting, resulting sometimes in profound falls in SaO2.
Based in the observations of Jounieaux et al., another study was designed using a volumetric ventilator. In the first part of this study we investigated on awake and asleep healtly subjects the effects of systematic changes in delivered tidal volume, delivered minute ventilation, respirator frequency and delivery inspiratory flow on effective minute ventilation, and tried to established the most effective combination of ventilator settings to perform nIPPV using volumetric ventilators in the controlled mode. In the second part we performed a retrospective clinical study of ventilator settings used in our group of patients submitted to long-term nIPPV, who were put on this therapy before the analysis of our experimental data in healthy subjects. Our data show that during both wakefulness and sleep, increases in effective minute ventilation should be obtained by increases in respirator frequency rather than in delivered tidal volume. Using these data we suggest that the “ideal” initial ventilator settings should be : a respirator frequency of 20/min, a delivered tidal volume of 13 ml/kg and a delivered inspiratory flow lower than 0.9 l/s. the average results found in the group of patients were surprisingly close to the “ideal” setting in healthy subjects.
Some authors showed that pressure and flow tracings can be used to assess respiratory muscles activity, or rest, during mechanical ventilation performed invasively or non invasively by a mouth piece or nasal mask. According to these authors, irregularities in pressure and/or flow tracings signal the reappearance of respiratory muscles activity. Jounieaux et al. observed in awake or asleep subjects under nIPPV episodes of glottic narrowing without changes in EMGdi (i.e. compete absence of electrical muscle activity). During such respiratory events, nasal mask pressure waveform showed irregularities despite complete abolition of EMGdi. To verify the hypothesis that glottic narrowing and widening can deform the nasal mask pressure waveform even during complete diaphragmatic rest, a last study was designed. We studied one healthy subject during wakefulness and sleep under nIPPV performed by a volumetric ventilator in a controlled mode, using a bipolar oesophageal electrode to assess respiratory diaphragmatic activity with the glottis being continuously monitored by a bronchoscope. Our results showed that irregularities of nasal mask pressure were present without activation of EMGdi and interpreted this as meaning that respiratory muscles level of activity can not be inferred from pressure tracings during nIPPV. It appears that electromyography remains the only reliable technique to assess diaphragmatic muscle activity during nIPPV.
In conclusion, our results show that under nIPPV the glottis represents the main determinant of effective ventilation reaching the lungs. Two-level nIPPV set in the spontaneous mode should be reserved to awake patients and IPAP levels should be close to 20 cm H2O. Two-level nIPPV in the spontaneous mode appears as unfit during sleep. Using the controlled or spontaneous-times modes, during wakefulness or sleep, an inspiratory pressure of 15 cm H2O or higher and a frequency of at least 17/min appear as capable of significantly increasing effective ventilation. When a volumetric ventilator is chosen to perform nIPPV the initial settings, in the controlled mode, should be a frequency about 20/min, a delivered tidal volume of 13 ml/kg and a delivered inspiratory flow below 0.9 l/s. Although these conclusions are mainly physiological based on studies performed in normal subjects, the mechanisms of the glottic response applies also to patients; so should these conclusions apply to patients too. We hope that this work has promoted a better understanding of the glottic behaviour, and its consequences, on effective ventilation during nIPPV, contributing to a wiser use of this extraordinary useful form of therapy La ventilation non-invasive est définie comme celle qui est appliqué sans court-circuiter les voies aériennes supérieures naturelles, ce qui exclut l’usage de tubes endotrachéaux ou de canules de trachéotomie. Il est difficile de déterminer la date précise à laquelle la ventilation non-invasive a été utilisée pour la première fois. Cependant, un respirateur de type poumon d’acier est décrit dès 1832 par John Daziel (Drumlaring, UK). C’est depuis 1987 que a ventilation non-invasive mise en œuvre au moyen de respirateurs à pression positive (nIPPV) est utilisé de façon croissante dans le traitement de patients en défaillance respiratoire aiguë ou chronique. En 1994 Hill écrit : « Les preuves qui soutiennent cette approche (la nIPPV) sont telles que les investigations doivent maintenant se déplacer des questions relatives à l’efficacité de la nIPPV vers des recherches quant à son mode d’action et à l’optimalisation de sa mise en œuvre ». En effet, de nombreux auteurs ont rapporté l’efficacité de cette thérapeutique sur les échanges gazeux, la réduction de l’activité diaphragmatique, l’amélioration des possibilités fonctionnelles, la durée de la survie, et la diminution des hospitalisations. Cependant, que ce soit en ventilation mécanique volumétrique ou barométrique, les réglages réalisés de façon empirique par essais et erreurs. Il n’existe pas, même dans les publications récentes, d’indications précises à ce sujet.
Par rapport à l’assistance ventilatoire réalisée chez des patients intubés ou trachéotomisés, la nIPPV se différencie par une caractéristique unique : l’existence d’une résistance supplémentaire et variable représentée par la glotte et interposée entre le respirateur et les poumons. En 1991, Delguste et al., ont décrit des épisodes d’apnées obstructives survenant pendant le sommeil chez les patient sous nIPPV par respirateur volumétrique ; ils postulent que ce phénomène pourrait correspondre à une fermeture active de la glotte, d’origine centrale et en réponse à une hypocapnie. Des études expérimentales postérieures réalisées par Jounieaux et al. chez des sujets normaux pendant la veille et le sommeil, la glotte étant monitorée en continu, confirment cette hypothèse et démontrent que la glotte représente un obstacle supplémentaire à la ventilation qui parvient effectivement aux poumons. En effet, des augmentations progressives de la ventilation delivrée par le respirateur provoquent une adduction progressive des cordes vocales, parfois jusqu’à la fermeture complète de la glotte avec apparition d’apnées et de fuites buccales. La conséquence de cette fermeture de la glotte tient principalement en une diminution progressive du pourcentage du volume courant délivré qui parvient effectivement aux poumons. De plus, des oscillations cycliques de l’ouverture glottique avec augmentations et diminutions correspondantes du volume courant effectif provoquent une respiration de type périodique. Ces études ont donc permis d’établir que l’optimalisation de la nIPPV devrait prendre en compte et s’adapter à la résistance variable représentée par la glotte.
En essayant de mieux comprendre la réponse glottique à la nIPPV, nous avons réalisé une série d’études qui forme le corps principal de ce manuscrit. Notre objectif a d’abord consisté à vérifier le comportement de la glotte et ses conséquences sur la ventilation minute effective, liés à des augmentations de la pression inspiratoire générée par un respirateur barométrique à deux niveaux de pression positive utilisé en mode contrôlé. Nous avons comparé l’adaptation glottique relative à ce mode ventilatoire à celle observée auparavant au moyen d’un respirateur volumétrique. Nous avons pu montré que, de par la réponse glottique à la nIPPV réalisée au moyen d’un respirateur à deux niveaux de pression positive, des augmentations de la pression inspiratoire appliquée ne s’accompagnaient pas nécessairement d’augmentations de la ventilation parvenant effectivement aux poumons. Nous en avons donc été amenés à penser que le mode ventilatoire idéal pourrait être non le mode contrôlé mais le mode spontané. Dans cette dernière situation, en effet, la stimulation ventilatoire n’est pas inhibée et les fonctions musculaires respiratoire et laryngée sont préservées Pour examiner cette hypothèque, nous avons réalisé une deuxième étude chez des sujets normaux, principalement pendant la veille, et nous avons observé qu’en effet le glotte présentait un comportement tout à fait normal et en jouait pas de rôle important dans le contrôle de la ventilation minute effective lorsque le respirateur barométrique à deux niveaux de pression positive était utilisé en mode spontané. Cependant, des augmentations significatives de la ventilation minute effective n’ont été obtenues qu’en utilisant de hauts niveaux de pression inspiratoire (20 cm H2O). Pour des niveaux de pression inspiratoire de 10 et 15 cm H2O, l’augmentation de volume courant effectif était compensée par une diminution de la fréquence respiratoire. Peu de données analysables ont pu être recueillies durant le sommeil, elles ont néanmoins permis d’observer la survenue d’apnées de longue durée avec fermeture complète ou partielle de la glotte.
Nous avons alors réalisé une autre étude relative à la ventilation mécanique barométrique à deux niveaux de pression positive dans le but de comparer, chez un autre groupe de sujets normaux, pendant la veille et le sommeil, l’efficacité des modes spontané et contrôlé. Afin de définir le mode ventilatoire qui permet d’obtenir la plus grande augmentations de la ventilation minute effective, nous avons analysé les effets d’augmentations de la fréquence respiratoire lorsque le respirateur est utilisé en mode contrôlé et les effets d’augmentations de la pression inspiratoire quand le respirateur est utilisé en mode spontané. Nous avons observé qu’une augmentation significative de la ventilation minute effective pouvait être obtenue par application d’une pression inspiratoire plus basse en mode contrôlé qu’en mode spontané. De plus, en mode contrôlé, le rythme respiratoire était régulier et sans apnée ni respiration périodique alors que chez des sujets endormis et ventilés en mode spontané, de très fréquentes apnées étaient observées, certaines étant suffisamment longues que pour provoquer de profondes chutes de la saturation en oxygène du sang artériel.
Nous basant sur les observations de Jounieaux et al., nous avons mené une quatrième étude dans le contexte de la ventilation volumétrique. Dans le première partie de cette étude, nous avons analysé chez des sujets normaux éveillés et endormis, les effets de changements systématiques du volume courant délivré, de la ventilation minute délivrée, de la fréquence respiratoire ainsi que du débit inspiratoire délivré sur le ventilation minute effective parvenant aux poumons. Nous avons essayé d’établir quelle serait la meilleure combinaison des paramètres à régler sur le respirateur pour optimaliser la nIPPV appliquée au moyen d’un respirateur volumétrique en mode contrôlé. La deuxième partie de cette étude est constituée d’une analyse clinique rétrospective relative aux paramètres ventilatoires appliqués à notre groupe de patients bénéficiant d’une assistance ventilatoire au long cours de type volumétrique, et placé sous ventilation avant analyse de nos données expérimentales chez les sujets normaux. Nos résultats montrent que tant durant la veille que durant le sommeil, une augmentation de la ventilation minute effective peut être obtenue plus efficacement par une augmentation de la fréquence respiratoire que par une augmentation du volume courant. Sur base de ces données, nous suggérons que les paramètres « idéaux » du respirateur devraient être : une fréquence respiratoire de 20 par minute, un volume courant de 13ml/kg et un débit inspiratoire délivré inférieur à 0.9l/s. les valeurs moyennes relevées chez nos patients se sont révélées étonnement poches de ces paramètres « idéaux » définis chez les sujets normaux.
Certains auteurs ont montré que l’analyse des tracés de pressions et débites ventillatoires relevés durant la ventilation mécanique par méthodes invesives ou non invasives permettait d’évaluer le degré d’activité des muscles respiratoires. Selon ces travaux, l’observation d’irrégularités dans les tracés de pressions et/ou de débits permet d’objectiver le réapparition d’une activité au niveau des muscles respiratoires préalablement au repos. Nos travaux semblent infirmer ce qui précède. En effet, nos observations, réalisées chez des sujets éveillés ou endormis sous nIPPV, ont permis d’objectiver des épisodes de fermeture glottique sans modification concomitante de l’EMGdi (i.e. absence complète d’activité électrique musculaire). Néanmoins, durant ces événements respiratoires, les courbes de pression relevées au niveau du masque nasal montraient des irrégularités. Afin de vérifier notre hypothèse selon laquelle les variations de l’ouverture glottique pouvaient occasionner une déformation de la courbe de pression relevée au niveau du masque nasal, alors même que le diaphragme restait totalement au repos, une dernière étude a été réalisée chez un sujet normal ventilé par voie nasale durant la veille et le sommeil, au moyen d’un respirateur volumétrique en mode contrôlé. Nous avons monitoré en continu, d’une part l’activité musculaire diaphragmatique au moyen d’une électrode œsophagienne bipolaire et, d’autre part, le degré d’ouverture de la glotte au travers d’un fibroscope. Ces enregistrements ont permis d’objetiver la présence d’irrégularité de la courbe de pression relevée au niveau du masque nasal en l’absence de toute réactivation de l’EMGdi. Nous en avons déduit que l’analyse de la courbe de pression enregistrée durant la ventilation non-invasive ne permettait pas de juger du degré d’activité des muscles respiratoires. Il semble que l’électromyographie reste la seule technique d’évaluation fiable de l’activité diaphragmatique pendant le nIPPV.
En conclusion, nos résultats montrent que sous nIPPV, la glotte représente le déterminant principal de la ventilation parvenant effectivement aux poumons. La ventilation mécanique par respirateur barométrique à deux niveaux de pression positive utilisé en mode spontané devrait être réservée aux patients éveillés et le niveau de pression inspiratoire devrait être réglé à une valeur proche de 20 cm H2O. Un respirateur barométrique à deux niveaux de pression positive réglé en mode spontané semble peu adapté à la ventilation mécanique pendant le sommeil. En mode contrôlé ou assisté-contrôlé, pendant l’éveil ou le sommeil, une pression inspiratoire de 15 cm H2O ou plus et une fréquence d’au moins 17/minute paraissent capables d’augmenter de façon significative la ventilation effective. Lorsque la nIPPV est réalisée au moyen d’un respirateur volumétrique, les paramètres initiaux réglés en mode contrôlé devraient être : une fréquence aux alentours de 20/minute, un volume réglés délivré de 13 ml/kg et un débit inspiratoire délivré inférieur à 0.9 l/seconde. Bien que ces conclusions soient principalement physiologiques et reposent sur des études réalisées chez des sujets normaux, nous avons montré que les mécanismes de réponse glottique à la ventilation mécanique par méthode non-invasive se vérifient également chez des patients. Nos conclusions devraient donc être également d’application dans ce contexte. Nous espérons que notre travail aura permis de mieux comprendre les mécanismes d’adaptation de la glotte et leurs conséquences sur la ventilation effective permise par la nIPPV. De la sorte, nous espérons avoir contribué à l’amélioration des modalités de mise en œuvre de cette thérapeutique remarquablement utile et efficace

Assisted ventilation of the neonate
Author:
ISBN: 0721692966 Year: 2003 Publisher: Philadelphia : Saunders,

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Bookmark

Abstract

Core topics in mechanical ventilation
Author:
ISBN: 9780521867818 0521867819 Year: 2008 Publisher: Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press,

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Bookmark

Abstract

Mechanical ventilation is a life-critical intervention provided to patients in a wide variety of clinical settings, involving the careful interplay of physiology, pathology, physics and technology. This unique text explains the underlying physiological and technical concepts of ventilation, aided by numerous full colour diagrams, and places these concepts into clinical context with practical examples. Core Topics in Mechanical Ventilation provides a broad and in-depth coverage of key topics encountered in clinical practice, from the initial assessment of the patient to transportation of the ventilated patient and weaning from ventilation. Issues such as sedation, analgesia and paralysis and the management of complications are reviewed, along with a discussion of various ventilation modes and practical advice on patients with pre-existing diseases. Appealing to doctors, nurses, physiotherapists and paramedics, this book is applicable to a wide range of settings including intensive care, anaesthesia, respiratory medicine, acute medicine and emergency medicine.


Dissertation
The thermodilution technique during artificial ventilation.
Authors: ---
Year: 1988 Publisher: Rotterdam : s.n.,

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Bookmark

Abstract


Dissertation
The way PEEP depresses cardiac output.
Authors: --- ---
Year: 1986 Publisher: Wijk bij Duurstede : Optimax,

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Bookmark

Abstract

Essentials of artificial ventilation of the lungs.
Author:
ISBN: 0443008612 Year: 1972 Publisher: London : Churchill Livingstone,

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Bookmark

Abstract

Tracheostomy and artificial ventilation in the treatment of respiratory failure
Authors: ---
ISBN: 071314288X Year: 1977 Publisher: London : Arnold,

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Bookmark

Abstract


Book
Clinical applications of ventilatory support
Author:
ISBN: 0443086133 Year: 1990 Publisher: New York (N.Y.) : Churchill Livingstone,

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Bookmark

Abstract

Principles and practice of mechanical ventilation
Author:
ISBN: 007064943X Year: 1994 Publisher: New York (N.Y.) : McGraw-Hill,

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Bookmark

Abstract

Listing 1 - 10 of 81 << page
of 9
>>
Sort by